To our partners and supporters, thank you for your unwavering commitment to the agenda of resilient and sustainable urbanization! Together with you, we look forward to a greener and better 2021 and beyond! #BetterUrbanPH

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LOCATION: UN-HABITAT
PROJECT REFERENCE: Healthy Oceans and Clean Cities Initiative – Philippines
DUTY STATION: Manila, Philippines
FUNCTIONAL TITLE: Solid Waste Management Associate
CONTRACT MODALITY LICA 7
DURATION 2 months, starting February 2021 with possibility of extension
ESTIMATED START DATE: 1 February 2021
 

United Nations Core Values: Integrity, Professionalism, Respect for Diversity

 

Vacancy Ad date: 18 December 2020

 

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL SETTING

 

UN-HABITAT

The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, UN-Habitat, is the United Nations agency for human settlements. It is mandated by the UN General Assembly to promote socially and environmentally sustainable communities, towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. In collaboration with governments, UN-Habitat is charged to promote and consolidate collaboration with all partners, including local authorities and private and non-government organizations in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 11, which seeks to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.  This is further elaborated in the New Urban Agenda.

By working at all levels and with all relevant stakeholders and partners, UN–Habitat contributes to linking policy development and capacity–building activities with a view to promoting cohesive and mutually reinforcing social, economic and environmental policies in national policies and programmes in urban development and human settlements which conform with international practices and covenants.

UN-Habitat established its country office in the Philippines in 2004 and runs national and city-level programmes.  The UN-Habitat Philippines Country Office (CO) positions itself as a strong policy adviser informed by well-grounded operational experience, harnessing its in-depth local knowledge, global expertise and international network of urban specialists, in the areas of urban planning and design, climate change adaptation and mitigation, urban legislation and governance and urban economy, in post-disaster community-driven recovery, reconstruction and resilience building, and in the climate change, urbanization and sustainable development nexus. The country office partners with national government departments and agencies, local authorities, a wide cross-section of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society groups, and the private sector. At the policy level, the country office supported the development of the Habitat III country report, the National Urban Development and Housing Framework, guidelines to strengthen the rationalized planning system, Local Shelter Planning and Local Climate Change Action Planning.

 

  1. PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND

The “Healthy Oceans and Clean Cities Initiative – Philippines (HOCCI)” is a 1-year project with the goal of helping local governments and communities in the Philippines reduce marine plastic pollution, in support of the implementation of the upcoming National Plan of Action on Marine Litter (NPOA-ML). The project seeks to address fundamental issues of plastic waste leakages to marine environment at each target city, with different priority activities depending on the local context. Circular economy and reduce, reuse, recycle (3Rs) approaches will be harnessed to reduce marine plastic waste pollution, as an integral part of an overall solid waste management (SWM) program.

 

  1. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The SWMA will have a supporting responsibility for providing SWM technical inputs and assistance in the implementation of 1-year work plan to the project team through development, coordination and implementation of the project strategies and approaches in a participatory manner.

Guided by the Project Document (ProDoc) and work plan, and in coordination with the Project Manager (PM), he/she will take the lead in the following specific activities:

 

  • Support the PM and the Team in providing technical advisory services on 3Rs and SWM measures and support regular consultations with partner city governments and local stakeholders in piloting innovative approaches;
  • Provide research support to the development of policy or white papers to address identified issues and directions in the NPOA-ML as will be recommended by the Project Advisory Committee (PAC);
  • Support LGU capacity development to implement 3Rs/SWM approaches by providing LGUs with a menu of good practices and by helping develop technical training modules;
  • Provide inputs and support the strategic implementation and reporting of project activities, in consideration of the needs of local partners and the international best practices that may be applied in the Philippine context;
  • In coordination with the PM, support the project team members in ensuring that communication, safeguards, livelihood and community organization are grounded on technically sound 3Rs/SWM concepts;
  • In coordination with the PM, provide targeted advice on emerging trends such as the post-COVID-19 “New Normal” and capacity development approaches of the project in collaboration with the city coordinators and the project consultants; and
  • Ensure lessons learnt are captured and documented and knowledge products such as tools or quick guides are developed based on the experiences of the project.

 

  1. Remuneration

The salary will be determined according to the qualifications, skills and relevant experience of the selected candidate.

 

  1. QUALIFICATIONS/SPECIAL SKILLS OR KNOWLEDGE

 

Qualifications
Education: With Bachelor’s Degree in environmental planning and management, engineering, or other related field.

 

Experience and skills: ·      At least 6 years of relevant work experience preferably with local government units and/or local stakeholders on 3Rs/SWM or marine plastic litter; otherwise, alternatively in the areas of environmental management, sustainable consumption and production, pollution control, and other related fields.

·      Good partnership building and networking skills

·      Good communication skills, interpersonal management, team worker

 

Language Requirements: proficient in written and spoken English.

 

  1. CORE VALUES AND COMPETENCIES

 

Core Values

  • Integrity – Demonstrates the values of the United Nations in daily activities and behaviours. Acts without consideration of personal gain.Resists undue political pressure in decision making. Does not abuse power or authority. Stands by decisions that are in the Organization’s interest, even if they are unpopular. Takes prompt action in cases of unprofessional or unethical behaviour.
  • Professionalism – Shows pride in work and in achievements. Demonstrates professional competence and mastery of subject matter. Is conscientious and efficient in meeting commitments, observing deadlines and achieving results. Is motivated by professional rather than personal concerns. Shows persistence when faced with difficult problems or challenges. Remains calm in stressful situations.
  • Respect for Diversity – Works effectively with people from all backgrounds. Treats all people with dignity and respect. Treats men and women equally. Shows respect for and understanding of diverse points of view and demonstrates this understanding in daily work and decision-making. Examines own biases and behaviours to avoid stereotypical responses. Does not discriminate against any individual or group.

 

Professional Competencies

  • Planning and Organizing: Develops clear goals that are consistent with agreed strategies; identifies priority activities and assignments; adjusts priorities as required; Allocates appropriate amount of time and resources for completing work; foresees risks and allows for contingencies when planning; monitors and adjusts plans and actions as necessary; uses time efficiently.
  • Communication: Speaks and writes clearly and effectively; listens to others, correctly interprets messages from others and responds appropriately; asks questions to clarify, and exhibits interest in having two-way communication; tailors language, tone, style and format to match the audience; demonstrates openness in sharing information and keeping people informed.
  • Client Orientation: Considers all those to whom services are provided to be “clients ” and seeks to see things from clients’ point of view; establishes and maintains productive partnerships with clients by gaining their trust and respect; identifies clients’ needs and matches them to appropriate solutions; monitors ongoing developments inside and outside the clients’ environment to keep informed and anticipate problems; keeps clients informed of progress or setbacks in projects; meets timeline for delivery of products or services to client.
  • Teamwork: Works collaboratively with colleagues to achieve organizational goals; solicits input by genuinely valuing others’ ideas and expertise; is willing to learn from others; places team agenda before personal agenda; supports and acts in accordance with final group decision, even when such decisions may not entirely reflect own position; shares credit for team accomplishments and accepts joint responsibility for team shortcomings.
  • Technological Awareness: Keeps abreast of available technology; understands applicability and limitation of technology to the work of the office; actively seeks to apply technology to appropriate tasks; shows willingness to learn new technology.

 

HOW TO APPLY

Submission of Applications

Application should include:

 

  1. Cover memo (maximum 1 page) including expectations regarding remunerations;
  2. A completed UN Personal History Form (P-11) – Please download the form (MS-Word) from UN- Habitat ROAP web site: http://www.fukuoka.unhabitat.org/vacancy/index_en.html;

 

All applications should be addressed to and sent electronically via e-mail to UN-Habitat’s Country Programme Manager, Christopher E. Rollo at cris.rollo@un.org copying the Finance and Admin Officer, Phillip Hilado phillip.hilado@un.org.

 

Please indicate in your e-mail subject: Solid Waste Management Associate

 

Deadline for Applications is on or before 31 December 2020.

 

Please note that applications received after the closing date stated above will not be given consideration. Only short-listed candidates whose applications respond to the above criteria will be contacted. The salary will be determined according to the qualifications, skills and relevant experience of the selected candidate. Details and conditions of the contract will be communicated at the interview.

 

In line with UN-Habitat policy on gender equity, applications from female candidates are particularly encouraged.

 

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

By applying to this post, you agree to UN-Habitat’s due diligence in securing highest standards of efficiency, competency and integrity from all its staff members. Candidates will not be considered for employment with United Nations if they have committed violations of international human rights law, violations of international humanitarian law, sexual exploitation or sexual abuse or if there are reasonable grounds to believe that the candidates have been involved in the commission of these acts.

UN-Habitat has a zero-tolerance policy on conduct that is incompatible with the aims and objectives of the United Nations, including sexual exploitation and abuse, sexual harassment, abuse of authority and discrimination. UN-Habitat also adheres to strict child safeguarding principles. All selected candidates will, therefore, undergo reference and background checks, and will be expected to adhere to these standards and principles.

 

UN-Habitat does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process.

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LOCATION: UN-HABITAT
PROJECT REFERENCE: Healthy Oceans and Clean Cities Initiative – Philippines
DUTY STATION: Manila, Philippines
FUNCTIONAL TITLE: Livelihood Officer
CONTRACT MODALITY LICA 8
DURATION 2 months, starting February 2021 with possibility of extension
ESTIMATED START DATE: 1 February 2021
 

United Nations Core Values: Integrity, Professionalism, Respect for Diversity

Vacancy Ad date: 18 December 2020

 

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL SETTING

 

UN-HABITAT

The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, UN-Habitat, is the United Nations agency for human settlements. It is mandated by the UN General Assembly to promote socially and environmentally sustainable communities, towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. In collaboration with governments, UN-Habitat is charged to promote and consolidate collaboration with all partners, including local authorities and private and non-government organizations in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 11, which seeks to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.  This is further elaborated in the New Urban Agenda.

By working at all levels and with all relevant stakeholders and partners, UN–Habitat contributes to linking policy development and capacity–building activities with a view to promoting cohesive and mutually reinforcing social, economic and environmental policies in national policies and programmes in urban development and human settlements which conform with international practices and covenants.

UN-Habitat established its country office in the Philippines in 2004 and runs national and city-level programmes.  The UN-Habitat Philippines Country Office (CO) positions itself as a strong policy adviser informed by well-grounded operational experience, harnessing its in-depth local knowledge, global expertise and international network of urban specialists, in the areas of urban planning and design, climate change adaptation and mitigation, urban legislation and governance and urban economy, in post-disaster community-driven recovery, reconstruction and resilience building, and in the climate change, urbanization and sustainable development nexus. The country office partners with national government departments and agencies, local authorities, a wide cross-section of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and civil society groups, and the private sector. At the policy level, the country office supported the development of the Habitat III country report, the National Urban Development and Housing Framework, guidelines to strengthen the rationalized planning system, Local Shelter Planning and Local Climate Change Action Planning.

 

  1. PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND

The “Healthy Oceans and Clean Cities Initiative – Philippines (HOCCI)” is a 1-year project with the goal of helping local governments and communities in the Philippines reduce marine plastic pollution, in support of the implementation of the upcoming National Plan of Action on Marine Litter (NPOA-ML). The project seeks to address fundamental issues of plastic waste leakages to marine environment at each target city, with different priority activities depending on the local context. Circular economy and reduce, reuse, recycle (3Rs) approaches will be harnessed to reduce marine plastic waste pollution, as an integral part of an overall solid waste management (SWM) program.

 

  1. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Under the supervision of the Project Manager, and guided by the project document (ProDoc) and work plan, the Livelihood Officer will:

  • Conduct livelihood assessment covering baseline data gathering on the informal, semi-formal and formal economic activities of possible project beneficiaries and partners, psycho-social and skills inventory, and environmental scanning of economic activities in the locality within the overall context of reducing marine plastic litter (MPL) through 3Rs and SWM;
  • Develop livelihood strategies for the project in consultation with the partner communities and other partners including the identification of best practices and lessons learned from similar livelihood interventions for application in the project as well as innovative approaches to strengthen the socio-economic resilience of target groups in the context of the post-COVID “New Normal”;
  • Assist the community partners in identifying markets, developing products, and accessing existing and new markets, such as in the case of high- and low-value recyclable plastic materials, residual wastes, environmentally acceptable products and packaging, and/or other alternative livelihood options;
  • In coordination with other project team partners, conduct training and other capacity building activities on livelihood opportunities and projects for partner communities and families, including entrepreneurial/business management skills and core technical competencies;
  • Support resource mobilization for the livelihood strategies and activities of the project, including leveraged funding, logistics, and market creation or linkages;
  • Establish partnerships with relevant government agencies, CSOs, private sector in the project implementation;
  • Develop a sustainable business plan for community groups/cooperatives/associations in partner cities upon facilitated identification of 3Rs/SWM related livelihood opportunities;
  • Ensure social, economic and environmental safeguards for livelihood programs in close coordination with the project’s Environmental and Social Safeguards and Reporting Specialist; and
  • In collaboration with the project team, provide information on the livelihood component of the project to relevant national and local governments, donors, NGOs/CSOs, UN agencies and other stakeholders.

 

  1. Remuneration

The salary will be determined according to the qualifications, skills and relevant experience of the selected candidate.

 

  1. QUALIFICATIONS/SPECIAL SKILLS OR KNOWLEDGE
Qualifications
Education: Master’s degree in Business Management, Economics, Enterprise Development or other related fields; OR Bachelor’s degree in combination with 8 years relevant work experience may be accepted in lieu of the advanced university degree.

 

Experience and skills: ·      At least 2 years of relevant work experience and with substantial knowledge preferably on 3Rs/solid waste management/marine plastic litter; and/or alternatively in the areas of environmental management, sustainable consumption and production, pollution control, and other related fields

·      Good partnership building and networking skills

·      Preferably has prepared a sustainable business plan for a community-based livelihood initiative or has led the formalization/registration of a community association or cooperative; Alternatively, sufficient experience of working with local communities in upgrading local economic development projects at community level

 

Language Requirements: Good communication skills with proficiency in written and spoken English

 

  1. CORE VALUES AND COMPETENCIES

Core Values

  • Integrity – Demonstrates the values of the United Nations in daily activities and behaviours. Acts without consideration of personal gain.Resists undue political pressure in decision making. Does not abuse power or authority. Stands by decisions that are in the Organization’s interest, even if they are unpopular. Takes prompt action in cases of unprofessional or unethical behaviour.
  • Professionalism – Shows pride in work and in achievements. Demonstrates professional competence and mastery of subject matter. Is conscientious and efficient in meeting commitments, observing deadlines and achieving results. Is motivated by professional rather than personal concerns. Shows persistence when faced with difficult problems or challenges. Remains calm in stressful situations.
  • Respect for Diversity – Works effectively with people from all backgrounds. Treats all people with dignity and respect. Treats men and women equally. Shows respect for and understanding of diverse points of view and demonstrates this understanding in daily work and decision-making. Examines own biases and behaviours to avoid stereotypical responses. Does not discriminate against any individual or group.

 

Professional Competencies

  • Planning and Organizing: Develops clear goals that are consistent with agreed strategies; identifies priority activities and assignments; adjusts priorities as required; Allocates appropriate amount of time and resources for completing work; foresees risks and allows for contingencies when planning; monitors and adjusts plans and actions as necessary; uses time efficiently.
  • Communication: Speaks and writes clearly and effectively; listens to others, correctly interprets messages from others and responds appropriately; asks questions to clarify, and exhibits interest in having two-way communication; tailors language, tone, style and format to match the audience; demonstrates openness in sharing information and keeping people informed.
  • Client Orientation: Considers all those to whom services are provided to be “clients ” and seeks to see things from clients’ point of view; establishes and maintains productive partnerships with clients by gaining their trust and respect; identifies clients’ needs and matches them to appropriate solutions; monitors ongoing developments inside and outside the clients’ environment to keep informed and anticipate problems; keeps clients informed of progress or setbacks in projects; meets timeline for delivery of products or services to client.
  • Teamwork: Works collaboratively with colleagues to achieve organizational goals; solicits input by genuinely valuing others’ ideas and expertise; is willing to learn from others; places team agenda before personal agenda; supports and acts in accordance with final group decision, even when such decisions may not entirely reflect own position; shares credit for team accomplishments and accepts joint responsibility for team shortcomings.
  • Technological Awareness: Keeps abreast of available technology; understands applicability and limitation of technology to the work of the office; actively seeks to apply technology to appropriate tasks; shows willingness to learn new technology.

 

HOW TO APPLY 

Submission of Applications

Application should include:

  1. Cover memo (maximum 1 page) including expectations regarding remunerations;
  2. A completed UN Personal History Form (P-11) – Please download the form (MS-Word) from UN- Habitat ROAP web site: http://www.fukuoka.unhabitat.org/vacancy/index_en.html;

 

All applications should be addressed to and sent electronically via e-mail to UN-Habitat’s Country Programme Manager, Christopher E. Rollo at cris.rollo@un.org copying the Finance and Admin Officer, Phillip Hilado phillip.hilado@un.org.

 

Please indicate in your e-mail subject: Livelihood Officer

 

Deadline for Applications is on or before 31 December 2020.

 

Please note that applications received after the closing date stated above will not be given consideration. Only short-listed candidates whose applications respond to the above criteria will be contacted. The salary will be determined according to the qualifications, skills and relevant experience of the selected candidate. Details and conditions of the contract will be communicated at the interview.

 

In line with UN-Habitat policy on gender equity, applications from female candidates are particularly encouraged

 

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

By applying to this post, you agree to UN-Habitat’s due diligence in securing highest standards of efficiency, competency and integrity from all its staff members. Candidates will not be considered for employment with United Nations if they have committed violations of international human rights law, violations of international humanitarian law, sexual exploitation or sexual abuse or if there are reasonable grounds to believe that the candidates have been involved in the commission of these acts.

UN-Habitat has a zero-tolerance policy on conduct that is incompatible with the aims and objectives of the United Nations, including sexual exploitation and abuse, sexual harassment, abuse of authority and discrimination. UN-Habitat also adheres to strict child safeguarding principles. All selected candidates will, therefore, undergo reference and background checks, and will be expected to adhere to these standards and principles.

 

UN-Habitat does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process.

The Urban Resilience Investment Forum 2020, a three-part virtual event jointly organized by the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development (DHSUD), Climate Change Commission (CCC), and United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), concluded last November 25 with five cities successfully presenting their innovative climate-resilience projects to potential investors and partners.  It gathered a total of almost 1,400 participants in its four-day run, representing the local government, national government agencies, private sector, development organizations, and the academe. Among the participants are investors from local commercial and government banks, private companies and donor agencies.

According to the World Cities Report 2020, delivering on the urban dimension of the Sustainable Development Goals will cost US$38 trillion. The financial resources are available globally, but they are not channeled to areas where they are most needed.

The Investment Forum served as a strategic platform for relevant stakeholders to participate and discuss the current landscape of support for city climate action plans, pressing issues in accessing financing solutions, and making finance flow from global and national sources down to the cities.

 

Financing Urban Resilience in Cities

“As we battle this pandemic, we as leaders, policy makers, planners, developers, and investors cannot compromise the future of our cities. We cannot separate the issues of urban development, climate change, and public health,” said Hon. Eduardo D. Del Rosario, Secretary of the DHSUD in his keynote message during Part 1 held on October 30.

The first part, held as prelude to World Cities Day, set the scene for thinking and the actions around financing urban resilience considering the global and national climate goals.

A plenary presentation highlighted the opportunities and challenges on climate financing in the Philippines, while a panel discussion, which represented the demand and supply side of climate finance,  analyzed the available financing mechanisms and funding sources, avenues for collaboration, current climate mitigation and adaptation projects supported by government finance institutions, and innovative models that cities can adapt for more climate-smart investments.

BCRUPD’s five partner cities had a scheduled session to present their urban plans and projects for climate resilience and green recovery to generate leads or commitments from financiers/investors.

Matching City-scale Solutions with Financing and Investments

Part 2, held on November 17 and 19, provided the venue for partner cities of the Building Climate Resilience through Urban Plans and Designs (BCRUPD) to pitch their urban plans and projects on climate resilience and green recovery with investors to explore funding and financial potentials that will support their plans and projects.

The cities of Angeles, Cagayan de Oro, Legazpi, Ormoc, and Tagum, led by their mayors, respectively presented the Angeles Aquipark which re-designs the landlocked city to address the negative impacts of climate change; Project Lunhaw which creates urban-friendly green spaces by transforming vacant spaces into climate adaptive recreational areas; Legazpi Urban Streetscape which aims to help the city adapt to the impacts of flooding, sea-level rise, and increasing urban temperatures; Ormoc Urban Waterscape which adopts nature-based and engineering design solutions to help address flooding, heat stress, and storm surge; and Tagumpay Citywalk which aims to protect its most vulnerable residents by introducing holistic and integrated urban design solutions.

The city presentations gathered validation, recommendations, and expressions of support from the private, socio-civic, and government sector at both local and national level.

“Through these promising urban resilience initiatives, we expect to improve the overall network in addressing the social issues arising from shared catastrophes, these will enhance government response to the affected areas in the future,” said Department of Budget Management Undersecretary Hernan Jumilla in support of the city projects.

“More than ever we have seen the critical role of our local government units (LGUs) all over the Philippines in responding to the immense challenges…To support our LGUs, the national government has put together economic stimulus measures to boost our health system and provide relief to sectors and families hardest hit by the pandemic,” added Assistant Secretary Tony Lambino of the Department of Finance. He elaborated these measures as the Bayanihan II or the Recover As One Act, as well as the calamity and climate loans offered by Landbank of the Philippines and the Development Bank of the Philippines.

 

Investing in Local Climate Solutions: Finance and Resilience Lessons for Urban Adaptation

Held last November 25 and coinciding with the 2020 National Climate Change Consciousness Week, Part 3 focused on finance and resilience lessons for climate-resilient green recovery and on advocating investment support for local climate actions.

“The scale and scope of issues related to climate change are complex in the urban setting, often with transboundary issues which amplify the need for solutions on a regional or metropolitan scale… As our cities re-strategize governance and planning  due to this pandemic, there is an opportunity to upgrade and transform  business-as-usual strategies and be more anticipatory and adaptive towards green Covid-19 recovery,” said Atty. Rachel Anne Herrera, Commissioner of CCC.

Resource persons from the supply, demand and user sides were invited to Part 3 of the Forum to give reactions based on discussions on climate finance and planned city actions on climate and green, sustainable recovery.

 

Lessons from the previous two parts of the forum were summarized by Maria Adelaida Antoinette Mias-Cea, Asia Pacific Regional Coordinator of the UN-Habitat Cities and Climate Change Initiative.

“When it comes to funding there are support mechanisms and financing available for our cities to deliver urban climate action. However, alignment has to be there. Global, national and local financing streams have to be clear such that climate finance can really flow and projects get implemented. Alignment and partnership with the private sector are really crucial and should be fully maximized. The question now is how can these be fostered? What is the business case? What are the incentives?”  She also recapped the challenges in terms of knowledge and capacity of cities, flexibility of investors, and scale of projects in making finance flow.

Resource speakers from the DHSUD, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, LBP, and ADEC Innovations shared their insights on maximizing land-based financing mechanisms, championing sustainability in the financial system,  financing programs for climate change, Gap Fund support, and impact investments, to name a few.

In closing, Christopher Rollo, Country Programme Manager of UN-Habitat Philippines, provided a picture of how the projects will move forward post-forum.

“The real test of these projects is to know whether they are just pipe dreams in the urban wish list or are actually bankable projects that can be financed and implemented. Thus, we encourage further conversations between cities and possible investors, partners and supporters to realize these projects.

At the national level, policy work continues with the finalization of the enhanced national guidelines on urban planning and design which will be translated into training modules for all local government units, with the city examples as concrete demonstration of useful tools and approaches.”

***

The Urban Resilience Investment Forum 2020 is organized as part of the Building Climate Resiliency through Urban Plans and Designs (BCRUPD), Phase 1, a three-year project that supports the Philippine government in improving policies, regulations, and capacities to adapt to climate change through the promotion of climate-responsive sustainable urban development plans and designs. BCRUPD is implemented by UN-Habitat and the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development in partnership with the Climate Change Commission, Department of the Interior and Local Government, National Economic and Development Authority and the League of Cities of the Philippines. The project is supported by the German Federal Government’s International Climate Initiative (IKI).

For more information on BCRUPD and the Urban Resilience Investment Forum 2020, visit  https://designingresilience.ph/ or follow http://facebook.com/bcr.upd or https://twitter.com/bcr_upd for updates.

Access presentations and session recordings here.

 

“There is nothing here now, everything has been flattened.”

Janodin Lao standing on the spot where his house was located prior to the 2017 Marawi Siege

This was the disheartened remark of Janodin Lao, 42, one of the thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) from Marawi City as a result of the five-month battle between ISIS-inspired militants and government forces in 2017. Three years after the siege, he returned home expecting to see posts and some walls standing as remnants of his house. But what welcomed him was flattened surface where not a single indication of his house remains — only memories of life remembered and retold.

 

In post-war Marawi where lack of comprehensive land and property records pose as a continuing challenge,  Janodin, as like other IDPs, hold on to the remaining debris as proofs of rights and ownership on housing, land, and property that they onced owned prior to the siege.  He did not sign any demolition consent, so he was devastated when he came face-to-face with an empty lot which used to be his home.
Janodin is one of the 1,500 home-partners of the Rebuilding Marawi through Community-driven Shelter and Livelihood Project being implemented by UN-Habitat Philippines in Marawi City, province of Lanao del Sur.  Funded by the People of Japan, the project supports recovery efforts aimed at empowering IDPs to become proactive champions in rebuilding homes, livelihood, and peace in the communities. Active participation is ensured in every step of the project implementation through the People’s Process approach. The 1,500 home-partners organized into 31  Homeowners Associations (HOAs) and 33 Cooperatives working together towards the construction of shelters, engagement in various livelihood activities, building their capacities for community development, and promoting peace-building and environment and social safeguards.

 

Participatory Process in STDM Adoption

Criteria in the Project

Community Baselining, Beneficiary Selection and Validation. Establishing the people-to-land relationship in post-conflict Marawi, particularly within the Most Affected Area (MAA)/Ground Zero where most structure lay in ruins, was a formidable challenge to the project. This is especially important since two of the beneficiary selection criteria requires linking houseowners with their physical house and its location. These two criteria are, 1) houseowners occupying the house for not less than three years, and 2) homeowners living within the 3-6 meters easement of Lake Lanao and Agus River – legally considered as no-dwell zone and high risk areas thus automatically barring  IDPs from returning to their original location.

 

The project referred to the master list of IDPs provided by the City Government through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).  As part of its validation process and in order to validate claims of meeting the priority criteria in beneficiary selection, UN-Habitat conducted transect walks in ground zero with barangay (village) and city officials and the IDPs  themselves who located their houses and marked the exact location in the map provided by the barangays.

 

UN-Habitat staff with some IDPs during the transect walk at ground zero

After the transect walk, shortlisted names were posted at strategic places at the Marawi City Hall for public viewing. Public feedback was encouraged within a specified period of time to confirm or challenge the names in the list and their qualification based on the criteria. The shortlisted names were also posted on the project’s social media page. As feedback came in, revalidation was conducted with barangay officials and key community leaders serving as key informants. Once this process was done, the final lists were posted.

 

Project Orientation and Briefing

Orientation on People’s Process and Project Briefing was conducted for those in the final lists. Families willing to participate in the Rebuilding Marawi Project signed a consent form while home-partners accomplished a Family Information Sheet (FIS) to document individual profile information about the home-partner and their families.  The information was stored in the database.

 

Mapping revalidation and database Link

Home-partners marking the pre-siege location of their houses on printed Google Earth satellite image

Further revalidation was conducted using printed Google Earth satellite images (from 2016, prior to the Marawi Siege) where the home-partners can identify the location and boundaries of their houses. Due to Covid-19 pandemic, where mobility restrictions are imposed, key officers of Homeowners’ Associations, and in some cases barangay captains, are invited to do the revalidation. This activity further helps UN-Habitat in the refining the project’s database by updating the information and linking their pre-siege location digitally in the database where their names and FIS data are stored.

Challenges in Adopting STDM:

Mapping revalidation and database updating amid Covid-19 pandemic

1. Covid-19 pandemic mobility restrictions limits community engagement in mapping revalidation and database updating. Because of restrictions, home-partners cannot easily be physically present at the venue;

2. Some HOA officers who were assigned to assist in determining the exact location of the house of their HOA members were unfamiliar with the site, making the process time-consuming; and,

3. Hesitancy in marking other home-partners’ location on the map for fear of making an error and thereby earning their ire.

 

Next Steps for STDM within the Rebuilding Marawi  Project Implementation

    1.  Once completed, the digital map with the database will be presented to project stakeholders, particularly the Task Force Bangon Marawi (TFBM).  This represents the final list of home-partners who have been included in the  priority list of the HOAs where they belong.
    2. The home-partners will be transferring to the shelter where their Homeowners’ Association are assigned. Each home-partner will be tagged to the location of their new house under the Rebuilding Marawi Project. This will be the initial recordation of land and housing rights in their new community.
Recommendations for Future Actions
As the Rebuilding Marawi Project draws to a close in the next six months, the following are areas recommended for future actions:

 

Shelter construction site, Brgy. Dulay West, Marawi City

  1. Formalization of the home-partners’ land rights (i.e. titling), either collective under their Homeowners’ Association (HOA) or individually, to ensure tenure security of the home-partners, depending on the agreement between the Rebuilding Marawi Project and its project partners, particularly those tasked in land procurement and site development: Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC), National Housing Authority (NHA), City Government of Marawi and Provincial Government of Lanao del Sur in coordination with Task Force Bangon Marawi. At this point, early coordination with land registration agency must be part of Estate Management and Sustainability Planning of the HOAs;

2. The formalization of land rights is recommended to prevent the possibility of residential land dispute among and between neighboring home-partners as they settle down in their new houses. Conflict preventive measures that may include the placing of markers (“mohon”) delineating boundaries of individual land area is recommended for consideration by the HOAs;

 

3. Mechanisms in updating the STDM in the future should be put in place by the HOAs as part of sustainability plan and as pro-active measure on people’s mobility, passing on of property titles as inheritance for surviving family members, etc.  For this to be possible, capacity-building on updating the STDM that taps into the existing technology know-how among younger generation family members of home-partners can be included in discussions and plans. This same goes with the necessary hardware (computer) and software support for this to be realized;

 

4.  Training and turn over to local government (i.e. City Assessor and Building Official, etc.), barangay officials and pertinent national government agencies (e.g. Land Registration Agency, Register of Deeds, etc.).  Sharing of the information to the City Social Welfare Office, the Ministry of Trade, Investment and Tourism, etc. can also be done to ensure provision of basic services the delivery of which, to be accurate and targeted, can make use of the comprehensive home-partners’ information made available through STDM;

 

5. The documentation of collective ownership and use of public spaces and ensuring that women have equal access to these spaces and their safety assured, merit further discussion as part of establishing people-to-land relationships in the new communities;

 

6.  Estate management to be established to ensure operation and maintenance of community facilities, basic services and public spaces; and,

 

7. Land management within the new settlement areas, particularly in light of climate change and natural hazards, is to be considered – e.g. coordinating with the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources for the prevention of soil erosion along creeks and elevated portions within and surrounding the subdivision.

 

Article originally published on Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) website. Click here to view original article.