Mission on groundwater management in Iloilo City December 2015_02

ARCADIS extends technical support to UN-Habitat Philippines to improve groundwater management in Iloilo City, December 2015

The ARCADIS Shelter Programme and the UN-Habitat Philippines conducted a joint mission in Iloilo City from 13 to 19 December 2015.

The mission was conceptualized to assess groundwater resource management particularly on issues such as availability, quality and governance. The mission team was composed of three water experts from ARCADIS in collaboration with local UN-Habitat staff and the City Planning and Development Office personnel.

Major findings and recommendations of the mission included the need for expanding the capacity of current groundwater wells to accommodate the 1.5 per cent annual population growth rate of the city, investing on surface water and rainwater harvesting technologies, establishment of comprehensive water quality monitoring and setting-up of data-based management systems, implementing protection zones around groundwater wells, creating a water management master plan for Metro Iloilo-Guimaras Economic Development Zone (MIGEDZ) and increasing the water governance function of the city with regard to permitting, distribution, operation and protection.

Mission on groundwater management in Iloilo City December 2015_01

Arch. Jose Roni Penalosa, Iloilo City Planning and Development Coordinator, acknowledged the findings and recommendations of the mission team and underscored the importance of this mission in dealing with the increasing issues of water governance. The report will be presented to the City Mayor and City Councilors to firm up political support.

The ARCADIS is an international leading natural and built asset design and consultancy firm that has partnered with UN-Habitat since 2010 to extend expertise in promoting sustainable urban development.

The technical mission was an activity within the Achieving Sustainable Urban Development programme.

 Mission on groundwater management in Iloilo City December 2015_04

Dr Lawrence Walters

Dr Lawrence Walters in Manila delivering the training programme he authored in land-based finance for governments.

Manila, December 12 2015 — National and local level governments in the Philippines were among the first to take part in UN-Habitat’s new land-based finance training programme.

Held in Manila from 9-11 December 2015, the training programme titled Leveraging Land: Land-Based Finance for Governments focused on instruments available to local governments to expand their revenue base and generate funds.

“One of the significant challenges facing urban authorities in developing countries is the availability of financial resources necessary to support and sustain urban development,” said Dr Lawrence Walters, principal author of the training programme.

“Many urban authorities are seriously under-resourced and hence are unable to meet the ever-growing demand for basic services and new infrastructure, as well as the maintenance of existing infrastructure and services. Land based finance aims to enhance the availability of resources for local governments.”

Liz Patterson from UN-Habitat’s Urban Economy Branch in Nairobi pointed out that land value increase is a result of actions done by government and society such as the construction of roads or development of adjacent public spaces.  Thus, this land value increase should benefit not just land owners but the government and general public.

Attended by senior representatives of national government agencies and five local government units, along with one regional representative from Myanmar, the training programme covered seven different land-based finance instruments. The participants chose to focus on three specific tools:

  1. betterment charges and special assessments
  2. developer exactions
  3. sale of development rights

Other land-based finance instruments covered in the training programme included recurrent taxes on land and buildings, land value increment taxes, land leases and sale of public lands, and transfer taxes and stamp duties.

UN-Habitat Country Programme Manager Christopher Rollo said the training gave participants a solid understanding of the various instruments, challenging participants to think critically regarding requirements to implement each tool, as well as how to use the tools or mix of tools to finance development programs and projects.

Group photo

Seated from left: Eileen San Juan, Cagayan de Oro City Investments and Promotions Officer; Christopher Rollo, UN-Habitat Country Programme Manager; Atty. Linda Hornilla, Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board Commissioner; David Garcia, UN-Habitat Urban Planner and Mapping Specialist; Standing from left: Don Rommel Dais, Local Assessment Operations Officer, Bureau of Local Government Finance; Carlos Cordero, City Assessor, Tacloban City.

Feedback from participants highlighted the effectiveness of gathering representatives from both national and local level government units, as each were able to inform the other on challenges and restrictions regarding existing laws and practices.

“The UN-Habitat sponsored land-based finance training is timely because of the national Government’s thrust for local government units to be self-sufficient and be more dependent on local resources,” said Stanley Buyco, Chief of Tax Mapping Division, Silay City.

“Local resources need not be in the form of new taxes. The land-based finance training presented us tools that local government units may use to finance local projects, especially in infrastructure development.”

At the end of the training programme, national government agencies and local government units developed action plans to improve upon and implement land-based financing in the country and respective local governments.

Former Professor at the Brigham Young University, Dr Lawrence Walters has completed more than 20 research projects in land policy and land reform for the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, National Science Foundation, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the US Forest Service and others. He has also personally worked with the Italian Prime Minister, Mario Monte, to assess property tax reform measures for the Italian Government.

The training programme was organized by UN-Habitat with support from the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN).

An evaluation of the training program can be downloaded here: Evaluation report (PDF)

 

Peoples Process Shelter - Volume 1 - Communities-1_1200pxVolume 1 of the six-volume series explores community experiences of working together through the People’s Process to rebuild homes following typhoon Yolanda.

The series is jointly published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐Habitat) and the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) in their effort to encapsulate the community and household partners’ experience with the People’s Process during their Post‐Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project.

Introduction

Community partnership emerged in the course of the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project. This collaboration made the project easier and more cost-effective because of the collective efforts of the communities who worked together for a common goal.

The project also strengthened inter-community relations and relived the Filipino “bayanihan” spirit. Mary’s Land, Sunrise Ville, and Golden Fields Homeowners Associations (HOAs) are three adjacent communities in Milibili, Roxas City, Capiz that never had any collaboration until the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project. Because of the small number of household partners from the three separate HOAs, UN-Habitat decided to merge the three and created a central committee which implemented the project. With the group’s synergy, the shelter project turned out to be 30 per cheaper because of their bulk purchase of construction materials.

San Vicente Phases I and II HOAs in Panay, Capiz, on the other hand, strengthened their ties and implemented a wider-range site development project. Shared community funds built the communities’ dream multipurpose center; and a centralized drainage system, another collaboration, is underway. The project has produced houses founded on partnership and cooperation as well as strengthened inter-community relations that can withstand and help cushion the blows of future disasters.

About the series

This publication series is an avenue to share the fruits of practicing People’s Process as it promotes strong relationships within the community and various bodies in the project, transforms communities even up until the household level, develops trust through a transparent financial mechanism, lays the groundwork for resilience and sustainability, and creates community leaders.

Through the stories of the people in this publication series, it is our hope that local governments, communities, and other stakeholders realize the viability and value of the People’s Process as an empowering principle and sustainable method of recovery and community development in their own localities or contexts.

Date published: December 2015
Publication type: Project publication (PDF)
Pages: 64

Peoples Process Shelter - Volume 2 - Partnership-1_1200pxVolume 2 of the six-volume series explores the importance of multi-stakeholder partnerships within shelter programmes.

The series is jointly published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐Habitat) and the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) in their effort to encapsulate the community and household partners’ experience with the People’s Process during their Post‐Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project.

Introduction

The Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project, implemented with the People’s Process, was a triumph of partnerships and alliance-building. It was jumpstarted with initial funding from the Government of Japan. This was augmented with additional finances by the Philippine Government through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).

But what made the construction of a sizeable number of permanent housing for Yolanda victims possible was that problems with land tenure were addressed early on by the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC), the lead government agency undertaking social housing programmes catering to formal and informal sectors in the low-income bracket.

Also brought to the table was the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC), the lead government agency in the Resettlement Cluster under the government’s Yolanda response program, the Comprehensive Recovery and Rehabilitation Program (CRRP). The Province of Capiz and the Province of Iloilo were active partners, too.

The houses were designed by a technical working group in collaboration with the partner families and Capiz chapters of the United Architects of the Philippines (UAP) and the Association of Structural Engineers of the Philippines to ensure their architectural and structural soundness. The Hilti Foundation, a Europe-based charitable foundation specializing in bamboo- based housing designs, was instrumental in building most of the housing units in Estancia, Iloilo through local affiliate BASE Bahay, Inc. The housing designs were submitted to the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) so it could check if the designs were compliant with typhoon- resilient design parameters including resistance to wind speeds of up to 250 kilometers per hour.

Harnessing the spirit of volunteerism, as well as its own budget, the BDO Foundation, Inc. (BDOF) constructed multipurpose centers to enhance the public life in partner communities. Private builders, barangay units, and local government units (LGUs) went out of their way to provide basic community infrastructure such as drainage systems and footwalks. Cross-community partnerships also prospered.

About the series

This publication series is an avenue to share the fruits of practicing People’s Process as it promotes strong relationships within the community and various bodies in the project, transforms communities even up until the household level, develops trust through a transparent financial mechanism, lays the groundwork for resilience and sustainability, and creates community leaders.

Through the stories of the people in this publication series, it is our hope that local governments, communities, and other stakeholders realize the viability and value of the People’s Process as an empowering principle and sustainable method of recovery and community development in their own localities or contexts.

Date published: December 2015
Publication type: Project publication (PDF)
Pages: 64

Peoples Process Shelter - Volume 3 - Rising From the Slums-1_1200pxVolume 3 of the six-volume series explores community experiences of rebuilding and upgrading their homes and communities following typhoon Yolanda.

The series is jointly published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐Habitat) and the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) in their effort to encapsulate the community and household partners’ experience with the People’s Process during their Post‐Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project.

Introduction

Among the marginalized communities engaged by the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project were overcrowded colonies of informal settlers. Poverty, unemployment, and lack of access to basic services and opportunities typify these neighborhoods.

At Welcome Village, Barangay Tabucin the Capiz town of Pontevedra, the original residents were seasonal workers and migrants from as far as Luzon, lured by the then lucrative fish farm industry in nearby Roxas City. Inhabitants of out-of-the-way island barangays (island districts/villages) were drawn to the edge of land that became Belle Village 1 Extension, also in Pontevedra, but in the swath of mangroves and marshlands just before the Panay River reaches the sea. Fishers elbowed each other for a roof over their heads in the neighborhood known as SUMaMa, an acronym for Samahang Urban ng Maralitang Mamamayan (Association of Urban Poor Citizens), in the contiguous districts of Villaluna, Sto. Niño, and Plantanians in Zone 1, Barangay Poblacion at the thriving fish port of Estancia in Iloilo province.

The people in these communities lived in squalor in flimsy patched up dwellings that were vulnerable to natural and man-made calamities. When Yolanda struck, many of these informal settlers were rendered homeless. But because they had the prescience to enroll their communities in the Community Mortgage Program (CMP) of the Social Housing Finance Corporation, which afforded them affordable financing so they could secure tenure on the land they occupied, they were considered eligible for permanent housing assistance under the Post-Yolanda shelter project.

From slums, these communities have proven themselves champions of the People’s Process, facilitating their transformation into more active communities. Over a year after the world’s strongest typhoon, Philippine slums rise from the rubble—but not as they were.

About the series

This publication series is an avenue to share the fruits of practicing People’s Process as it promotes strong relationships within the community and various bodies in the project, transforms communities even up until the household level, develops trust through a transparent financial mechanism, lays the groundwork for resilience and sustainability, and creates community leaders.

Through the stories of the people in this publication series, it is our hope that local governments, communities, and other stakeholders realize the viability and value of the People’s Process as an empowering principle and sustainable method of recovery and community development in their own localities or contexts.

Date published: December 2015
Publication type: Project publication (PDF)
Pages: 64

Peoples Process Shelter - Volume 4 - Financial Transparency_1200pxVolume 4 of the six-volume series explores community experiences of being trained in financial management in order to handle the funds required to rebuild their homes following typhoon Yolanda.

The series is jointly published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐Habitat) and the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) in their effort to encapsulate the community and household partners’ experience with the People’s Process during their Post‐Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project.

Introduction

The monetary grant from the Government of Japan and the Department of Social Welfare and Development played an integral part in the success of the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project. It fuelled the project to achieve its goals of constructing disaster-resilient houses and implementing site development plans. But more than the funds, the project’s success was due to the community partners’ proper fund disbursement and transparent transactions.

One of the principles of the People’s Process is to let the communities handle their own funds, with monitoring and supervision from UN-Habitat. Before embarking on this huge task, finance and committee heads were given sufficient financial literary trainings, since most of them had not encountered bank transactions. The BDO Foundation was with the household partners in every step of the way. Other communities did not have savings, so handling millions of cash was an entirely new concept to them.

Some communities had haunting experiences of financial management. With the proper guidance from UN-Habitat and other partners, the communities accomplished the task with flying colors. The experience also inculcated the value of saving and paying the monthly dues on time. It has greatly improved the communities’ collection for the monthly amortization needed in paying for their loans through the Social Housing Finance Corporation’s (SHFC) Community Mortgage Program (CMP). Furthermore, the project has given these communities experiences no amount of money can buy— community trust and transparency.

About the series

This publication series is an avenue to share the fruits of practicing People’s Process as it promotes strong relationships within the community and various bodies in the project, transforms communities even up until the household level, develops trust through a transparent financial mechanism, lays the groundwork for resilience and sustainability, and creates community leaders.

Through the stories of the people in this publication series, it is our hope that local governments, communities, and other stakeholders realize the viability and value of the People’s Process as an empowering principle and sustainable method of recovery and community development in their own localities or contexts.

Date published: December 2015
Publication type: Project publication (PDF)
Pages: 64

Peoples Process Shelter - Volume 5 - Resilience_1200pxVolume 5 of the six-volume series explores community experiences of learning disaster risk reduction construction techniques while rebuilding their homes following typhoon Yolanda.

The series is jointly published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐Habitat) and the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) in their effort to encapsulate the community and household partners’ experience with the People’s Process during their Post‐Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project.

Introduction

Yolanda wreaked havoc in the central Visayan islands in the Philippines, including 100 cities and municipalities on several islands such as Leyte, Samar, Cebu, Mindoro, Panay, and Palawan, among others. Official estimates peg at 1.1 million the number of houses destroyed or damaged. But from being helpless calamity victims, people in the communities engaged through the People’s Process by the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project are now active advocates of resilience and disaster risk reduction (DRR)—a key transformation brought about by the groundbreaking project.

Household partners in the 28 partner communities in Panay Island were given training on how to rebuild their homes using DRR techniques. And they used the insights they gained from the series of training sessions not only in the construction of their new homes; they also provided guidance to those rendered homeless by the super typhoon but who were unable to avail of the project’s housing units.

Called the Household Self-Assessment Guiders, or HAGs, they went around their neighborhoods, and sometimes outside, checking out non- project-constructed homes, flagging possible structural problems and offering workable, affordable solutions in “building back better” resilient housing units using locally available materials and non-complicated processes. When the next typhoon came along, straight toward their still-traumatized communities, their DRR preparedness served them in good stead. Now, they are DRR disciples for life—and beyond their communities.

About the series

This publication series is an avenue to share the fruits of practicing People’s Process as it promotes strong relationships within the community and various bodies in the project, transforms communities even up until the household level, develops trust through a transparent financial mechanism, lays the groundwork for resilience and sustainability, and creates community leaders.

Through the stories of the people in this publication series, it is our hope that local governments, communities, and other stakeholders realize the viability and value of the People’s Process as an empowering principle and sustainable method of recovery and community development in their own localities or contexts.

Date published: December 2015
Publication type: Project publication (PDF)
Pages: 64

Peoples Process Shelter - Volume 6 - Creating Leaders_1200pxVolume six of the six-volume series explores the ways in which the shelter project increased the leadership abilities of community members while their homes were being rebuilt following typhoon Yolanda.

The series is jointly published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN‐Habitat) and the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) in their effort to encapsulate the community and household partners’ experience with the People’s Process during their Post‐Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project.

Introduction

Stories from the ground did not only prove the positive physical changes that the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project brought to the partner communities. The project went beyond its main purpose and enriched the innate leadership skills in every community leader. Through the project’s highly participative approach, many community leaders were

developed, while some of them have drastically improved. The capacity building activities, and the passionate coaching and mentoring from the community organizers, boosted the communities’ confidence in facing the difficulties and technicalities of the project. The reluctant housewives of Pawa homeowners association (HOA), led by a fire survivor, Nora Verbo, have transformed into role models of women empowerment. These women successfully led and managed the construction process while their husbands worked as fishermen. Most of them can now confidently articulate the processes of people-initiated, DRR recovery to other groups who visit their community for learning exchange activities. Long-time organization leaders learned new lessons in handling communities of diverse individuals. They were also able to pass on the skills and created new leaders within their community. Members of the Belle Village III HOA initiated pro- environment measures in their community as part of their mitigation initiatives against climate change. The once dormant communities are now active agents of change, taking the bigger leap towards resilience and sustainable development.

About the series

This publication series is an avenue to share the fruits of practicing People’s Process as it promotes strong relationships within the community and various bodies in the project, transforms communities even up until the household level, develops trust through a transparent financial mechanism, lays the groundwork for resilience and sustainability, and creates community leaders.

Through the stories of the people in this publication series, it is our hope that local governments, communities, and other stakeholders realize the viability and value of the People’s Process as an empowering principle and sustainable method of recovery and community development in their own localities or contexts.

V-LED Inception Workshop

 

A dialogue event on climate actions for low emission development was held in Manila on 7-8 December 2015. Invited guests discussed low emission development initiatives at the global, national and local levels, and identified areas of work — especially on capacity development that would support scaling up current low-emission development projects, as well as initiate new support initiatives.

Background

The success of a global response to the climate challenge depends on the coordinated effort at multiple levels. However, in spite of national climate and green growth strategies and targets being in place, very few countries have been able to establish dynamic vertical policy coordination mechanisms between the national and local levels. It is against this backdrop that UN-Habitat Philippines continues to support government’s efforts in responding to challenges of climate change.

Starting last quarter of 2015 until 2018, UN-Habitat will implement two, but interrelated, projects:

  1. Vertical integration and learning on low emission development (V-LED) with support of the International Climate Initiative (IKI)-Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) and in partnership with Adelphi Research GmbH; and
  2. Strengthening capacities of national and regional level governance to mainstream climate change concerns into national urban-related policies with UNEP and UNESCAP as partners. Both projects are geared toward supporting government in integrating climate change into national urban policy and fostering low-emission development at the national and local levels.

In the Philippines, local governments are complying with their mandates to formulate their comprehensive plans and mainstream local climate change actions into such mandated plans. Much is happening at the local level and this makes it important to further support such local efforts and vertically link to national programs and policies with climate and sustainable energy strategies and policies integrated into the process.

Event outcomes

The workshop on low emission development attended by key representatives from national, provincial and local governments was filled with insightful discussions.

Groups raised key challenges including the need for capacity building on low emission development for national and local government agencies and units, additional coordination mechanisms for existing mitigation efforts, tool sharing and support, as well as the need for the sustainability of low emission development efforts as many are project-based.

Preliminary deliberations on the possible focus areas of a new three-year programme on low emission development, titled V-LED, include general knowledge building, the creation of tools and guides, strategic supportive partnerships, policy agenda and experiential learning opportunities. The programme is being implemented by UN-Habitat and Adelphi, with support from the Government of Germany.

Conversations also highlighted the need to shift the emphasis away from merely requiring cities and municipalities to accommodate climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts in their plans, to incorporating or mainstreaming climate change into all their processes as well.

Cities should be encouraged, or inspired, to initiative low-emission development activities, particularly projects that address both climate change adaptation and mitigation, both when undertaking planning cycles and as opportunities arise.

Stakeholder presentations included:

  • Climate Change Commission initiatives supporting national government and local government units on low emission development
  • Recent programmes and activities on greenhouse gas inventories and audits in the Philippines
  • Challenges and opportunities for mitigation actions in the context of local climate change action plans
  • Climate change mitigation in the enhanced guide to land use planning: Process, gaps and opportunities for LEDS to be integrated
  • Local government experiences of low-emission development projects, including BLeaders and greenhouse gas emission framework plans

Downloads:

Workshop program (PDF)

Mission report by Adelphi (PDF)

Survey responses from participants (PDF)

To find out more about V-LED and its international scope go to:

www.localclimateaction.org

 

SHFC photo

EXPANDING THE PEOPLE’S PLAN. UN-Habitat has renewed its partnership with the Social Housing Finance Corporation to build more disaster-resilient communities in the country, especially in Yolanda-affected areas. SHFC Vice President Atty. Rosalie Taguian and UN Habitat Country Programme Manager Christopher Rollo, together with Capiz local officials, led the MOU signing held in Pontevedra, Capiz.

 

The United Nations Human Settlement Programme in the Philippines (UN-Habitat Philippines) has renewed its partnership with the Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) to facilitate faster recovery and reconstruction of Yolanda-affected areas in the Visayas and Luzon.

The signing of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) held in Pontevedra, Capiz on 3 December 2015, led by SHFC Vice President for the Visayas and Mindanao Atty. Rosalie Taguian and UN-Habitat Country Programme Manager Christopher Rollo, marked the expansion of the “Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements Project,” a community-driven recovery and rehabilitation of Yolanda-hit communities in Capiz and Iloilo, to other areas in the country.

KM Launch1

The event was held during ‘Urban Poor Solidarity Week’ and was attended by government and civil society representatives, program partners and members from the project communities.

Under the MOU, SHFC and UN-Habitat will continue to advocate the community-driven approach in their shelter responses in Palawan, Tacloban City, Leyte, and other Yolanda-hit communities, which will undergo Post-Yolanda recovery projects. Aside from building houses, SHFC and UN-Habitat will also implement capacity building programs that will equip the communities on resiliency and climate change adaptation.

The community-driven approach, also called the ‘People’s Process,’ is an alternative method of implementing housing programs that enables the community to lead their housing projects. This approach results in faster delivery of housing needs especially in post-disaster areas, as illustrated in the recently-completed project which enabled the construction of 660 disaster-resilient houses, 54 community infrastructures in 28 communities and the training of more than 4,000 households on disaster resiliency. The approach has also been successfully implemented by UN-Habitat in post-disaster contexts in Sri Lanka, Indonesia and other Asian countries.

Atty. Taguian said that the partnership will continue to bring out the best in every community so that they will be able to lead their way to recovery and resilience. SHFC is the lead government agency providing shelter financing solutions to underprivileged communities in the Philippines (for more information visit www.shfcph.com).

People's process book covers2

Covers of the six-volume publication launched at the event.

Local leaders in Capiz including Vice Governor Esteban Contreras who attended the event expressed their intentions in collaborating with SHFC and UN-Habitat in the implementation of community-driven recovery in their respective areas.

Aside from the MOU signing, a six-volume publication titled ‘People’s Process in Shelter Recovery’ and a video on people-initiated disaster recovery were launched.

The publications, a joint project of SHFC and UN-Habitat, highlight the lessons of the ‘Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements Project’ in Capiz and Iloilo, and showcase the inspiring stories of people and communities who were empowered to lead their own recovery and rebuilding after Typhoon Yolanda.

Mr Rollo said that the six-volume publication will serve as a guide and inspiration to other communities that were also affected by super typhoon Yolanda and who are undergoing the process of rehabilitation and recovery.

Further information and digital copies of the publications and video can be accessed here:

People’s Process in Shelter Recovery

·         Volume 1 – Communities Coming Together

·         Volume 2 – Multiple Stakeholder Partnerships

·         Volume 3 – Rising from the Slums

·         Volume 4 – Financial Savvy and Transparency

·         Volume 5 – Ripple Effect Resilience

·         Volume 6 – Creating Leaders

·         Video – The People’s Process in Post-Disaster Shelter Recovery